Maui County, Hawaii

According to mcat-test-centers.com, Maui County is a county located in the state of Hawaii and consists of the islands of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kahoolawe. It is located in the eastern part of the Hawaiian Islands and has a population of 167,841 as of 2020. Maui County is home to some of Hawaii’s most iconic attractions such as Haleakala National Park, which features an extinct volcano; Iao Valley State Park; and Lahaina Harbor. The county seat is Wailuku, which is located on the island of Maui.

Maui County has many fascinating facts that make it one of Hawaii’s most unique counties. For example, it is the second largest county in Hawaii by land area with 2,079 square miles; it has more than 90 miles of beaches; and it has more than 200 miles of coastline. It also has one city (Lahaina) and two towns (Kahului and Hana). The county’s economy is mainly based on tourism with many visitors coming to experience its pristine beaches and natural beauty. Maui County also boasts some unique local cuisine such as poke bowls, shave ice desserts, loco moco dishes, lomi salmon dishes, laulau dishes, plate lunches, malasadas (Portuguese doughnuts), manapua (steamed buns filled with pork or vegetables), and musubi (rice balls with various fillings).

Maui County also offers a variety of activities for visitors to enjoy including whale watching tours off the coast of Lahaina; snorkeling trips at Molokini Crater near Makena Beach; zip lining through Iao Valley State Park; visiting historical sites such as Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge or Puu Kukui State Forest Reserve; hiking trails at Haleakala National Park or Waihee Ridge Trail; visiting local farms for fresh produce or tropical fruits like mangoes or papayas; exploring underwater caves at Olowalu Reef Marine Preserve near Lahaina Town; kayaking trips around Lanai Island; surfing lessons at Hookipa Beach near Paia Town on Maui Island; swimming with dolphins off Makena Beach on Maui Island.

Maui County, Hawaii

History of Maui County, Hawaii

Maui County, Hawaii is located on the eastern part of the Hawaiian Islands and consists of four main islands: Maui, Molokai, Lanai, and Kahoolawe. The county has a population of 167,841 as of 2020 and its county seat is Wailuku located on the island of Maui. Maui County has a rich history that dates back centuries before it became part of the United States in 1898.

The first settlers to arrive in Maui County were Polynesians who migrated to the islands from Tahiti around 1000 AD. These early settlers brought with them their culture, language, and traditions which are still evident today throughout the county. During this time period, various tribes developed in each area with different chiefs ruling over each tribe. This tribal system was eventually replaced by a unified kingdom under King Kamehameha I in 1795 when he conquered all four main islands of what is now known as Hawaii. After this unification, King Kamehameha I moved his royal court to Lahaina on Maui Island which served as an important center for politics and trade throughout his reign.

In 1819, American traders arrived in Lahaina aboard the ship Thaddeus and began trading goods with local residents. This marked an important point in Hawaiian history as it initiated contact between Hawaiians and Westerners which would lead to major social and political changes for the kingdom. In 1820 missionaries arrived from New England who aimed to spread Christianity throughout the islands and set up churches such as Wailuku Union Church which still stands today in downtown Wailuku.

In 1848 Queen Kaʻahumanu signed a treaty with Great Britain granting them access to Pearl Harbor while also allowing other countries access to ports across Hawaii for trade purposes including Lahaina Harbor on Maui Island where whaling ships would dock every year for supplies and repairs until 1887 when commercial whaling came to an end due to overhunting whales by whalers around the world.

In 1893 a group of American businessmen overthrew Queen Liliʻuokalani resulting in the formation of Republic of Hawaii which lasted until 1898 when Hawaii was annexed by USA becoming its 50th state – although some native Hawaiians still claim sovereignty over these islands today.

Since then Maui County has become one of Hawaii’s most popular tourist destinations due its natural beauty featuring pristine beaches, lush rainforests, stunning waterfalls, unique local cuisine such as poke bowls or shave ice desserts; cultural attractions such as Haleakala National Park or Iao Valley State Park; historical sites such as Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge or Puu Kukui State Forest Reserve; whale watching tours off Lahaina coast; snorkeling trips at Molokini Crater; zip lining through Iao Valley State Park; hiking trails at Haleakala National Park or Waihee Ridge Trail; visiting local farms for fresh produce or tropical fruits like mangoes or papayas; exploring underwater caves at Olowalu Reef Marine Preserve near Lahaina Town; kayaking trips around Lanai Island; surfing lessons at Hookipa Beach near Paia Town on Maui Island; swimming with dolphins off Makena Beach on Maui Island.

Major cities and towns in Maui County, Hawaii

Maui County is made up of four major islands- Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Kahoolawe- as well as several smaller islands. The largest city is Kahului located on the island of Maui and it is home to the main airport, harbor and commercial center. Other larger cities in Maui County include Wailuku, Lahaina, Kihei and Makawao.

Kahului is a bustling city with plenty of shopping options from small local markets to large department stores. It also features the largest mall on Maui Island with a variety of restaurants, cafes and entertainment venues such as movie theaters or arcades. The harbor here offers a great opportunity for whale watching tours or other boat excursions such as sunset cruises or snorkeling trips to Molokini Crater off Maui’s south shore.

Wailuku is located near the West Maui Mountains in central Maui and it features a variety of attractions including Iao Valley State Park which offers great hiking trails with stunning views of lush tropical rainforest; Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge which offers plenty of bird watching opportunities; Puu Kukui State Forest Reserve featuring numerous waterfalls; Wailuku Union Church which was built by missionaries from New England in 1820; Bailey House Museum which tells the story of Hawaii’s past through artifacts and photographs; Alexander & Baldwin Sugar Museum which showcases the history of sugar production on Hawaii’s plantations.

Lahaina Town on West Maui is one of Hawaii’s most popular tourist destinations due to its stunning beaches, unique shops, delicious local cuisine such as poke bowls or shave ice desserts; cultural attractions such as Haleakala National Park or Iao Valley State Park; historical sites like Lahaina Harbor where whaling ships used to dock every year until 1887 when commercial whaling came to an end due to overhunting whales by whalers around the world; whale watching tours off Lahaina coast; snorkeling trips at Molokini Crater; zip lining through Iao Valley State Park; hiking trails at Haleakala National Park or Waihee Ridge Trail; visiting local farms for fresh produce or tropical fruits like mangoes or papayas; exploring underwater caves at Olowalu Reef Marine Preserve near Lahaina Town etcetera.

Kihei Town on South Maui boasts some of Hawaii’s best beaches including Wailea Beach – one of Hawaii’s top rated beaches – offering plenty of water activities such as surfing lessons at Hookipa Beach near Paia Town on Maui Island or swimming with dolphins off Makena Beach on South Shore etcetera. Kihei also features numerous restaurants serving delicious local cuisine from poke bowls to shave ice desserts plus many shopping options ranging from small boutiques selling beachwear apparel to larger stores offering souvenirs for visitors.

Makawao Town located near Haleakala Volcano in Upcountry Maui offers plenty of outdoor activities ranging from zip-lining through Iao Valley State Park or hiking trails at Haleakala National Park to kayaking trips around Lanai Island etcetera plus unique shopping options featuring galleries selling artwork made by local artists, boutiques selling handmade jewelry crafted by native Hawaiians etcetera. It also features some great restaurants serving delicious local cuisine like poke bowls or shave ice desserts plus local farmers markets selling fresh produce like mangoes or papayas grown right here in Upcountry Maui.

Postal codes in Maui County, Hawaii

According to Countryaah, Maui County, Hawaii is made up of five postal codes: 96761, 96768, 96778, 96793 and 96708. These five postal codes cover the entire county from West Maui to South Maui and East Maui to Upcountry Maui.

The most populous area in Maui County is 96761 which covers the cities of Kahului, Wailuku and Puunene. Kahului is the main port of entry for visitors to Maui as it houses the main airport on island and is home to many hotels and resorts. Wailuku is the county seat and it’s downtown area features a variety of restaurants, shops, museums and galleries. Puunene is an agricultural area with farms growing tropical fruits like mangoes or papayas plus sugar cane fields for local production of Hawaii’s famous macadamia nut products.

The second most populous area in Maui County is 96768 which covers the city of Lahaina plus Kaanapali Beach which are both popular tourist destinations due to their stunning beaches, unique shops, delicious local cuisine such as poke bowls or shave ice desserts; cultural attractions such as Haleakala National Park or Iao Valley State Park; historical sites like Lahaina Harbor where whaling ships used to dock every year until 1887 when commercial whaling came to an end due to overhunting whales by whalers around the world; whale watching tours off Lahaina coast; snorkeling trips at Molokini Crater etcetera.

The third largest postal code in Maui County is 96778 which covers Kihei Town on South Shore plus Makena Beach on Wailea-Makena Coast offering plenty of water activities such as surfing lessons at Hookipa Beach near Paia Town on Maui Island or swimming with dolphins off Makena Beach etcetera. Kihei also features numerous restaurants serving delicious local cuisine from poke bowls to shave ice desserts plus many shopping options ranging from small boutiques selling beachwear apparel to larger stores offering souvenirs for visitors.

The fourth largest postal code in Maui County is 96793 which covers Makawao Town located near Haleakala Volcano in Upcountry Maui offering plenty of outdoor activities ranging from zip-lining through Iao Valley State Park or hiking trails at Haleakala National Park to kayaking trips around Lanai Island etcetera plus unique shopping options featuring galleries selling artwork made by local artists, boutiques selling handmade jewelry crafted by native Hawaiians etcetera. It also features some great restaurants serving delicious local cuisine like poke bowls or shave ice desserts plus local farmers markets selling fresh produce like mangoes or papayas grown right here in Upcountry Maui.

Finally, 96708 covers Haiku Town located on North Shore between Paia Town and Makawao Town offering plenty of outdoor activities such as horseback riding through nearby ranchlands or exploring nearby waterfalls like Twin Falls off Hana Highway etcetera plus unique shopping options featuring galleries selling artwork made by local artists, boutiques selling handmade jewelry crafted by native Hawaiians etcetera. Haiku also features some great restaurants serving delicious local cuisine like poke bowls or shave ice desserts plus local farmers markets selling fresh produce grown right here in North Shore.

In summary, each postal code within Maui County offers something unique for visitors whether they’re looking for stunning beaches with plenty of water activities; cultural attractions such as Haleakala National Park; historical sites like Lahaina Harbor; whale watching tours off Lahaina coast; snorkeling trips at Molokini Crater; zip lining through Iao Valley State Park; hiking trails at Haleakala National Park or Waihee Ridge Trail; visiting local farms for fresh produce or tropical fruits like mangoes or papayas; exploring underwater caves at Olowalu Reef Marine Preserve near Lahaina Town etcetera – there’s something for everyone.